Discussion:
Deduction Topples Einstein
(trop ancien pour répondre)
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-14 11:07:55 UTC
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Setup:

A light source emits a series of pulses equally distanced from one another. A stationary observer (receiver) measures the frequency:

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The observer starts moving with constant speed towards the light source and measures the frequency again:

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Premise 1: The moving observer measures the frequency to be higher.

Premise 2: The formula

(measured frequency) = (speed of the pulses relative to the observer)/(distance between the pulses)

is correct.

Conclusion: The speed of the pulses relative to the moving observer is higher than relative to the stationary observer, in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-15 08:28:59 UTC
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The argument saying that, since the frequency varies for the moving observer, the speed of light relative to him varies as well, is inherent in the correct interpretation of the Doppler effect and cannot be removed - Einsteinians can only camouflage it. Yet sometimes the camouflage is imperfect and Einsteinians unconsciously repudiate Einstein's relativity:

Albert Einstein Institute: "In this particular animation

http://www.einstein-online.info/images/spotlights/doppler/doppler_detector_blue.gif

which has the receiver moving towards the source at one third the speed of the pulses themselves, four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses." http://www.einstein-online.info/spotlights/doppler

The conclusion

"Four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses"

is equivalent to

"The speed of the pulses relative to the moving observer is higher than relative to the source"

which is fatal for Einstein's relativity of course.

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-15 13:29:01 UTC
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All correct interpretations of the Doppler effect imply that the speed of light relative to the observer varies with the speed of the observer. Sometimes this is stated explicitly - if the observer starts moving toward the source with speed v, the speed of the light waves relative to him becomes c'=c+v:

http://a-levelphysicstutor.com/wav-doppler.php
"Vo is the velocity of an observer moving towards the source. This velocity is independent of the motion of the source. Hence, the velocity of waves relative to the observer is c + Vo. [...] The motion of an observer does not alter the wavelength. The increase in frequency is a result of the observer encountering more wavelengths in a given time."

http://physics.bu.edu/~redner/211-sp06/class19/class19_doppler.html
"Let's say you, the observer, now move toward the source with velocity Vo. You encounter more waves per unit time than you did before. Relative to you, the waves travel at a higher speed: V'=V+Vo. The frequency of the waves you detect is higher, and is given by: f'=V'/λ=(V+Vo)/λ."

Pentcho Valev

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