Discussion:
Post-Truth Science (Einstein's Relativity)
(trop ancien pour répondre)
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-06 08:43:25 UTC
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Brian Cox, Jeff Forshaw: Why Does E=mc2?: (And Why Should We Care?), p. 91: "...Maxwell's brilliant synthesis of the experimental results of Faraday and others strongly suggested that the speed of light should be the same for all observers. This conclusion was supported by the experimental result of Michelson and Morley, and taken at face value by Einstein." https://www.amazon.com/Why-Does-mc2-Should-Care/dp/0306818760

These are the two fundamental lies on which the teaching of Einstein's relativity is based. The truth is quite different: Maxwell's 19th century theory had predicted that the speed of light varies with the speed of the observer, and in 1887 the Michelson-Morley experiment showed that it varies with the speed of the light source as well.

Given the two fundamental lies, the teaching of Einstein's idiocies is unproblematic:

Robert Scherrer, Professor and Chair of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University: "When scientists developed the theory of light back in the 19th century, it came with a special puzzle: their theory seemed to show that every observer should measure the same speed for light, about 186,000 miles per second. But that means if you try to chase a beam of light, no matter how fast you move, the light beam will still fly away from you at 186,000 miles per second. And what's even more bizarre is that if you are moving at 99% of the speed of light, and your friend is standing still, both of you will see the light moving away at exactly the same speed. Many scientists back then didn't really believe this odd prediction, and the American physicist Albert Michelson (along with his collaborator Edward Morley) set out to measure how the speed of light would change due to the motion of the earth through space. But their famous Michelson-Morley experiment found no change at all. The speed of light seemed to be the same regardless of whether they measured it in the same direction the earth was moving, or in some other direction - a rare example of a non-discovery that turned out to be more important than a discovery! Instead of trying to explain away this bizarreness, Albert Einstein embraced it. He built an entire theory, called special relativity, around the idea that the speed of light is the same for everyone who measures it, no matter how fast they are moving in relation to the light. In order to accommodate this behavior for light, Einstein's theory predicted that time and space would have to stretch or contract as someone traveled with increasing speed." https://theconversation.com/faster-than-light-travel-are-we-there-yet-41112

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-06 16:02:59 UTC
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All Einsteinians know that Maxwell's 19th century theory predicted VARIABILITY of the speed of light but only two or three of them find it suitable to tell the truth:

http://www.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/papers/Chasing.pdf
John Norton: "That [Maxwell's] theory allows light to slow and be frozen in the frame of reference of a sufficiently rapidly moving observer."

http://www.amazon.com/Brief-History-Time-Stephen-Hawking/dp/0553380168
Stephen Hawking: "Maxwell's theory predicted that radio or light waves should travel at a certain fixed speed. But Newton's theory had got rid of the idea of absolute rest, so if light was supposed to travel at a fixed speed, one would have to say what that fixed speed was to be measured relative to. It was therefore suggested that there was a substance called the "ether" that was present everywhere, even in "empty" space. Light waves should travel through the ether as sound waves travel through air, and their speed should therefore be relative to the ether. Different observers, moving relative to the ether, would see light coming toward them at different speeds, but light's speed relative to the ether would remain fixed."

Similarly, the fact that in 1887 the Michelson-Morley experiment demonstrated VARIABILITY of the speed of light is described in Wikipedia but Einsteinians almost universally teach the opposite:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emission_theory
"Emission theory, also called emitter theory or ballistic theory of light, was a competing theory for the special theory of relativity, explaining the results of the Michelson–Morley experiment of 1887. [...] The name most often associated with emission theory is Isaac Newton. In his corpuscular theory Newton visualized light "corpuscles" being thrown off from hot bodies at a nominal speed of c with respect to the emitting object, and obeying the usual laws of Newtonian mechanics, and we then expect light to be moving towards us with a speed that is offset by the speed of the distant emitter (c ± v)."

Pentcho Valev
Pentcho Valev
2017-05-06 23:23:27 UTC
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Einstein's most blatant lie:

Albert Einstein: "Now let us suppose that our railway carriage is again travelling along the railway lines with the velocity v, and that its direction is the same as that of the ray of light, but its velocity of course much less. Let us inquire about the velocity of propagation of the ray of light relative to the carriage. It is obvious that we can here apply the consideration of the previous section, since the ray of light plays the part of the man walking along relatively to the carriage. The velocity W of the man relative to the embankment is here replaced by the velocity of light relative to the embankment. w is the required velocity of light with respect to the carriage, and we have w = c - v. The velocity of propagation of a ray of light relative to the carriage thus comes out smaller than c. But this result comes into conflict with the principle of relativity set forth in Section V." http://www.bartleby.com/173/7.html

Does w = c - v come into conflict with the principle of relativity? It doesn't of course and this is obvious. Moreover, w = c - v is the only result compatible with the Michelson-Morley experiment without recourse to ad hoc miracles (length contraction, time dilation etc.). Yet the idiotic "conflict" made up by Einstein justifies, according to him, the introduction of special relativity. Einstein continues:

Albert Einstein: "In view of this dilemma there appears to be nothing else for it than to abandon either the principle of relativity or the simple law of the propagation of light in vacuo. [...] At this juncture the theory of relativity entered the arena. As a result of an analysis of the physical conceptions of time and space, it became evident that in reality there is not the least incompatibility between the principle of relativity and the law of propagation of light, and that by systematically holding fast to both these laws a logically rigid theory could be arrived at. This theory has been called the special theory of relativity to distinguish it from the extended theory, with which we shall deal later. In the following pages we shall present the fundamental ideas of the special theory of relativity."

Pentcho Valev

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